Scotiabank Archives

The Scotiabank Archives and Information Management (AIM) office was established as a department in 1967, by the Chief General Manager of The Bank of Nova Scotia, to formalize the collection of business records that had accumulated from The Bank’s beginnings in 1832.  As one of the early corporate archives in Canada, AIM is an innovator in the corporate cultural heritage community and provide program development advice to similar organizations.

This site has been created to give viewers a glimpse of Scotiabank’s archival collection, get information about our program and learn about our history.

Pieces of History

Enjoy putting together a selection of digital jigsaw puzzles while getting to know some of the unique and interesting items from Scotiabank’s collections.

Find out more, Pieces of History
The Scotiabank Timeline

As one of Canada's leading financial institutions, Scotiabank takes pride in investing in its history. Dating back to 1671 through the acquisition of the Mocatta Group (est. 1671), the Group's history can be explored through an online timeline.

Find out more, The Scotiabank Timeline
For Those Who Served

Scotiabank pays tribute to and recognizes the men and women of the Bank and its amalgamated companies that served in the major conflicts of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Find out more, For Those Who Served
Breaking the Barriers

The financial sector since its inception has been dominated by men. Reflecting the social and economic realities of the time, The Bank of Nova Scotia was founded in the nineteenth century by men of vision.

Find out more, Breaking the Barriers
The Scotiabank Story

Learn about our journey of how we have grown from a small coffee shop in Halifax, Nova Scotia to a leading bank in the Americas. 

Find out more, The Scotiabank Story
Donating Records

We are always looking for new donations to add to our Collection of the Scotiabank experience.   

Find out more, Donating Records

Archives Email: archives@scotiabank.com | Copyright 2019

Scotiabank Archives