Finalists - 2013 Shortlist

The 2013 Scotiabank Giller Prize Shortlist

ABOUT THE 2013 SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE FINALISTS

From HELLGOING by Lynn Coady. Copyright © Lynn Coady, 2013. Excerpt reproduced with the permission of House of Anansi Press. www.houseofanansi.com. All rights reserved.

Jury Citation:

The eight stories in Lynn Coady’s Hellgoing offer a stupendous range of attitudes, narrative strategies, and human situations, each complete and intricate, creating a world the reader enters as totally as that of a novel, or a dream. Yet the book as a whole is also magically united by Coady’s vivid and iconoclastic language, which brims with keen and sympathetic wit. Whether from the perspective of a writer flailing in the social atmosphere of a professional conference, or a woman trying to extend forgiveness to a lover’s abusive father, Coady offers a worldview full of mournful humor, ready indignation, and vertiginous possibility; the reader feels in the presence of life itself.

Biography:

LYNN COADY is the author of the bestselling novel The Antagonist, which was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, as well as the novels Mean Boy, Saints of Big Harbour, and Strange Heaven and the short story collection Play the Monster Blind. She has been shortlisted for the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour, and has four times made the Globe and Mail’s annual list of Top 100 Books. Originally from Cape Breton, she now lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where she is a founding and senior editor of the award-winning magazine Eighteen Bridges.

Excerpted from GOING HOME AGAIN by Dennis Bock. Copyright © Dennis Bock, 2013. Excerpted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Jury Citation:

With a poet's precision, Dennis Bock limns the inner landscape of a man in crisis, using elegant language to chart the lonely, least-articulated corners of the human heart. Struggling with his divorce, Charlie Bellerose is thrown into even greater conflict when he is forced to revisit a tragedy from his past. From the very first page, one feels the sure hand of a master at work; this is a novel of secrets and lies, of betrayal and murder, a searing emotional portrait that deepens and intensifies to the point of breaking. But Bock's patient confidence as a storyteller, and his light touch, ensure that the novel resists melodrama, even as it refuses to look away. Going Home Again is a graceful lament, an eloquent novel about what can be lost, and what regained: a true testament to the enduring passions of being alive.

Biography:

DENNIS BOCK’S first book of stories, Olympia, won the CAA Jubilee Award, the Danuta Gleed Award and the Betty Trask Award. His novels include The Communist’s Daughter and The Ash Garden, a #1 bestseller and winner of the Canada-Japan Literary Award and finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, a Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, the Kiriyama Prize and the Amazon.ca First Novel Award. Dennis Bock lives in Toronto.

Excerpted from CATARACT CITY. Copyright © 2013 Craig Davidson. Published by Doubleday Canada, a division of Random House of Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

Jury Citation:

Craig Davidson’s novel plunges us beneath the surface of “Cataract City”– so nicknamed for its well-known tourist attraction, Niagara Falls, but also for the eye diseases caused by its industrial pollution. Owen and Duncan grow up together in the scuffle and shove of this town, survive a traumatic forest ordeal involving a dead professional wrestler, and end up on opposite sides of a sordid smuggling operation. This energetic, gritty, violent, often comic but sorrowful novel is passionately felt and crisply executed, with perfect pitch for the human imperfections that are its keynote.

Biography:

CRAIG DAVIDSON was born and grew up in the bordertown of St. Catharines, Ontario, near to Niagara Falls. He has published two previous books of literary fiction, Rust and Bone (Penguin Canada), which has been made into a major feature film of the same name, and The Fighter (Penguin Canada). He is a graduate of the famed Iowa Writers' Workshop, and his journalism and articles have been published in The Globe and Mail, Esquire, GQ and the Washington Post, among other venues. He lives in Toronto, Canada, with his partner and child.

From CAUGHT by Lisa Moore. Copyright © Lisa Moore, 2013. Excerpt reproduced with the permission of House of Anansi Press. www.houseofanansi.com. All rights reserved.

Jury Citation:

Lisa Moore’s Caught envelops the reader in an atmosphere of droll, ominous, daylight noir, populated with charming, morally-compromised dreamers and rumpled policemen, all of them entrenched in historical and geographic specifics presented casually, but with great clarity. This is a story of friendships and romance, of affiliations as treacherous as they are unavoidable, with betrayal lurking everywhere. The language is compressed, fierce but never dry, loaded with yearning, with sex and desperation, and passage after passage reveals fissures where the emotions pour through.

Biography:

LISA MOORE is the acclaimed author of February, which was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, selected as one of The New Yorker's Best Books of the Year, and was a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book; and Alligator, which was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and won the Commonwealth Fiction Prize (Canada and the Caribbean), and was a national bestseller. Her story collection Open was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and a national bestseller. She lives in St. John's, Newfoundland.

Excerpted from THE CROOKED MAID by Dan Vyleta. Copyright © Dan Vyleta, 2013. Excerpted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Jury Citation:

Dan Vyleta’s The Crooked Maid is set in Vienna right after World War II. Factory-owner Herr Seidel has either fallen or been thrown from a window by his ex-Nazi son, Wolfgang. A trial is followed by a murder, and the maid who holds the key to both is crooked in more ways than one. Naïve stepson Robert longs for truth and goodness, but both are as shadowy as the missing men who haunt the city in this deft, unsparing exploration of the rancour, desperation, and moral distortions left in the wake of war.

Biography:

DAN VYLETA is the son of Czech refugees who immigrated to Germany in the late 1960s. He now calls Canada home. His debut novel, Pavel & I, was published in thirteen countries and translated into eight languages. His most recent novel, The Quiet Twin, was a finalist for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize.

Relive the announcement and celebration of the 2013 Scotiabank Giller Prize shortlist, presented October 8, 2013 at Soho House in Toronto. Hosted by Jian Ghomeshi, the event included a musical interlude with Jill Barber, followed by the announcement from Giller Prize jurors Esi Edugyan, Jonathan Lethem and Margaret Atwood.